home  :  get our free newsletter  :  past newsletters  :  become a sponsor  :  donate  :  contact us
community weblog  :  community calendar  :  discussions  :  login

community weblog - [ Animals ]

Bald eagle ailment puzzles experts Disease found along lower Wisconsin River

  #
 

MILWAUKEE — A disease infecting bald eagles along the lower Wisconsin River has wildlife experts puzzled, nearly a decade after it first appeared.

No one knows what causes the ailment, which wildlife specialists say generally manifests itself in live animals as grand mal seizures.

Experts say the limited scope and area of the disease indicate something peculiar to the lower Wisconsin is contributing to the ailment.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and National Wildlife Health Center have conducted investigations to look for infectious agents, environmental pollutants and poisons in the eagles' forage.   more...

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Groups sue to block killing of cormorants

  #
 

WASHINGTON — A coalition of animal welfare groups sued the federal government Thursday trying to block new rules allowing for the killing of double-crested cormorants.

Double-crested cormorants, which are large, dark birds, live throughout North America, with the highest U.S. populations on the Great Lakes. They were nearly wiped out by DDT in the 1960s and '70s, but they have made enough of a comeback to pose a threat to commercial fishing and fish farming, proponents of the new rules say.

Last year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agreed, and issued a rule allowing state, federal and tribal officials in 24 states, including Wisconsin and Minnesota, to kill the birds to prevent decimation of fish populations.   more...

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Cougar management

  #
photo: outdoorA volunteer for the past six years at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Eleanor Comings was going about her routine of checking the park's trails when something big crossed her path.

A mile and a half from the head of Old Indian Trail, she called in the sighting of a cougar over her radio -- asking park officials to come out to the site -- but knew she was on her own for a while.

"I was close enough that I could have just patted it on the back," Comings, of Frankfort, recalled of her encounter last fall. "It stopped right in front of me. ... It moved off the right, on a deer path."   more...

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Blood Brothers - A bear expert's risky research ends in disaster

  #

outdoor adventure imageON OCTOBER 6, Willy Fulton eased his Beaver floatplane down into Alaska's Katmai National Park and remote Kaflia Bay, a broad mosaic of ocean beach, braided waterways, dense thickets of alder, and sedge fields yellowing in the autumn chill. His plan was to pick up his friends Timothy Treadwell, 46, and Amie Huguenard, 37, both of Malibu, California, who spent each summer living among the many brown bears—as coastal Alaska's large grizzlies are known—that congregate in this salmon-heavy wilderness at the base of the Alaska Peninsula.

But something was very wrong. Descending into camp, the bush pilot spotted a flattened tent, and a large grizzly on top of what looked like a human body. Fulton buzzed the bear with his plane, but it refused to budge. He landed on an adjacent lake and immediately called state troopers on Kodiak Island, across the bay, and Katmai National Park headquarters, in King Salmon, 100 miles to the north.   more...


 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Happy Birthday to the H2ONotes Editor!

  #

When the cat's away, the mice will play!

Happy 50th Birthday to Mike, the Editor of H2ONotes. He couldn't have picked a better place to celebrate the big 5-0: Key West Race Week! Mike is a crew member aboard Renegade.

RENEGADE CLOTHINGWhile he's away, the rest of us here at H2ONotes wanted to take this opportunity to thank him for all he does...basically everything! Mike tirelessly locates all of the great content your read about in our newsletters and distributes it to you, our readers...completely on a volunteer basis!

If you like H2ONotes, and would like to send Mike a Happy Birthday wish, please email him at editor@h2onotes.com.



Animals  Events  Sailing  

discussion

  discuss this article

Condo guests a little quacky

  #

PhotoWhere they came from and how they got here are a mystery.

And the two in question are not talking -- at least not in a way humans can comprehend.

That's because the two new residents of a pond at Bridgewood Condominiums off Southwest Capital Avenue are ducks. But they're not your ordinary mallards. They appear to be Muscovy ducks, which are domesticated and normally found in warm climates.

The ducks, with black and white feathers and red fleshy outgrowths around their eyes, first showed up at a pond at the condominium in mid-October, residents say.

Since then a handful of neighbors -- including Charles and Ilona Bartha and condo association president Fred Wright -- have been feeding the ducks and calling organizations trying to find them a new home. None of the organizations they've called can take the ducks, including Binder Park Zoo, Humane Society-Calhoun Area, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Kalamazoo Nature Center, Kellogg Bird Sanctuary and Wildside Rehabilitation and Education Inc. in Eaton Rapids, said Ilona Bartha.

"My concern is that they might starve. They need water and they need food and even if the vegetation around the pond is OK for them to eat, how will they get to it once everything is snow covered?" she said, adding that most of the pond behind her condominium is frozen.    more...

 

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Michigan Grayling Only a Memory

  #
You don't know what you've got 'til it's gone," sang Joni Mitchell, a folksinger from the 1960s. This is an especially appropriate sentiment regarding the sad-but-true story of the grayling. Once a native fish species in Michigan, these fish now reside on the list of Michigan's extinct species.

 

Michigan's grayling were described as being especially lovely fish. Slate blue in color, they sported a particularly distinctive and graceful sail-like dorsal fin. In the 19th century, northern Michigan's streams literally teemed with them and lore has it that anglers from that time could sometimes catch three fish with one cast. Early historical accounts tell of grayling that "lay like cordwood in the AuSable." With our state as their only Midwestern home, Michigan grayling were descendants of fish that found a niche and thrived in our state's waters after the glaciers of the Ice Age receded. more...

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Arctic Grayling Thymallus arcticus.

  #

Other names for Arctic grayling: American grayling, Arctic trout, Back’s grayling, bluefish, grayling, sailfin Arctic grayling; French: ombre artique, poisson bleu.

Grayling belong to the Salmonidae family and are related to trout and whitefish. They are distinctive-looking fish with a sail-like dorsal fin, and a superb sportfish known primarily in the cool- and coldwater northern regions of North America and Europe. Their firm, white flesh is good eating, though not on a par with the wild trout and charr that inhabit similar ranges, although they are excellent when smoked.

Identification. With their graceful lines, large fin, and dramatic coloration, grayling are striking fish. Most striking is their large, purple to black dorsal fin which extends backward and fans out into a trailing lobe, speckled with rows of spots, which may look bluish while the fish is in the water. Generally grayish-silver overall, grayling usually have shades or highlights of gold and/or lavender, as well as many dark spots which may be shaped like Xs or Vs on some fish.   more...

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Quieting the Cry of the Wilderness: Loons at Risk

  #

HOUGHTON, Mich. -- Loons, whose haunting calls are a hallmark of the northwoods, may be at serious risk from an activity beloved by many wilderness visitors.

"Loons are not fans of canoes," says Joseph Kaplan, who is completing his master's degree in forestry at Michigan Technological University. "We are finding that recreation, especially canoeing, on Isle Royale's inland lakes seems to be having an impact on productivity."

Kaplan has been studying the nesting behavior of loons at Isle Royale National Park. Located in Lake Superior, the 850-square-mile island is America's least-visited national park, which, ironically, may make its loons more vulnerable to human disturbance.   more...



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Calmer waters could be ahead for GLA

  #
Great Lakes Aquarium has seemed more like a wild roller coaster than a freshwater attraction this past year.

A year ago today, Duluth officials seized control of the aquarium when it ran out of money.

But now, there's money in the bank and a possible long-term deal with Ripley Entertainment Inc. on the table.

Aquarium board members hope to have a five-year management contract with Ripley signed Nov. 19. They would not release the terms of the contract because of the negotiations.   more...

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

For The Birds

  #

OMENA - To migrating birds, the northern end of the Leelanau Peninsula is one of the great freeway rest stops of North America - a place to stop and catch a good meal before resuming their journey.
      And the folks who live there are working hard to make sure it stays that way.
      On Saturday, birders and outdoor enthusiasts from around the region will gather in Omena for the dedication of a new "Habitat Discovery Center" that will teach property owners how to preserve and improve their land for the benefit of birds - both those that live there year-round and the ones that are only visiting.  more...


 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Osprey chicks hatch inside park

  #

Three male osprey chicks were recently born at Kensington Metropark, a sign that the effort to re-establish the threatened bird species in the region is a continuing success.

The future looks even brighter, officials say.

"Male birds are more likely to return to the area in which they were raised, so these birds will likely jump start our efforts to bring the osprey back to southeast Michigan," said Lori Sargent, the wildlife biologist in charge of the project for the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR).   more...


 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

A rest stop fit for a monarch

  #
POINT PELEE, ONT. -- It's just after eight on an early-September morning.

The sound of crickets, the wash of waves on the shore and an almost tropical cacophony of birdsong greet us as we approach the forest of Point Pelee National Park. On this thin wedge of land that cuts into Lake Erie at the southernmost tip of mainland Canada, a remarkable migration is under way.

Throughout this month, millions of monarch butterflies will pass through here, nesting for a night or more before fluttering their way to the mountains of central Mexico.

The monarch is unique among butterflies in its marathon flight. I came to find out why these black-and-orange beauties gather here before setting off on their journey.  more...

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

SAVING TURTLES FROM TRAFFIC

  #

Driving on country roads can sometimes be like navigating an obstacle course of wildlife - deer, skunks, raccoons, frogs, and throughout much of the summer - turtles. Turtles like to lay their eggs along roadsides and become easy candidates for roadkill. They live and reproduce for decades, so when an adult is killed prematurely, it can have a big effect on turtle populations as a whole. Researchers are trying to find out how often turtles cross the road and how to help them get safely to the other side.   more...

 

 

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Lamprey back; lake clean

  #

ImageThe silver lamprey is making a comeback in Lake St. Clair, an indication that the water in the lake and the St. Clair River where they spawn is of good quality, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources concluded this week. more...

 

 

 



Animals  

discussion

  discuss this article

Prev 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  [21]  22  Next

You are on page 21
A total of 22 pages are available.

Items 301-315 of 324.


<<  |  April 2019  |  >>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
31123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
2829301234
567891011

view our rss feed



Copyright 2019 Edict Incorporated
280 Mill Street, Suite A | Rochester, MI 48307 | (248) 650-4962
privacy statement | contact us